Category Archives: Blogging

A quick guide to writing for the web

The contemporary web and the way we use it is changing. Gone are the days when you developed a website and forgot about it. These days, websites are much more interactive, accessible and transparent. With more and more people going on line to find information, websites are becoming a powerful way for businesses to serve their audiences.

The Internet is all about collaboration, sharing ideas, information and concepts with people. Writing for the web is different to writing for print media because of the way people consume information on line.

Think about how you use the web. You’re in search of information and if you don’t find it on the page you’re looking for, you click away and look elsewhere. In this attention deficit era, it is vital to serve the right information to the right users in the right way and retain their attention.

Internet users, in general, “snack consume” because of information overload and time constraints.

When writing for the web it is important to remember that great content is vital and being able to find what you are looking for is of paramount importance. It is the key for convincing audiences to take your desired actions and conveying commitment to them.

Good writing techniques will enrich your reader’s experience by making information accessible and creating value for audiences. Websites need to be dynamic to keep them relevant and interesting. You need to provide them with timeous  updates that offer them a reason to return to the site regularly.

Content writing that’s current and kept up-to-date makes a positive statement. Here are some steps to achieving this:

Analyse the audiences

You have many audiences that need to be catered for. Understanding your audiences is important to evaluate the specific needs of each niche group. This will help you organise the information in a way that makes sense to them and direct the content you create.

Before writing:

  • Know your audience – which audience are you writing for?  Find out their levels of digital literacy, who they really are and what they would like/need to know;
  • Know your services –understand your offering and look at it from the view point of your audiences, What actions do I want them to take?; and
  • Understand the users’ emotions – tap into their positive emotions like generosity and pride. What information do they need in order to take action?

“It is not about digital. It’s about people.” – Robbin Phillips

Aspects of good copy

Research into the way that people use a website, indicates that adoption will take place if three conditions are met:

  • They must see the point, they should have a reason to read the content;
  • It should be easy to use; and
  • It should make them look and feel good.

Here are some essential guidelines for writing content that will fulfil the three overarching principles of engaging the audience; delivering on user requirements by providing the information they require, being easy to understand and making the user look and feel good.

Good headlines will attract attention to copy before images. The first couple of words are the most important as readers will scan this before deciding to read further. Headlines must therefore be specific to the topic to attract and retain attention.

Make the page name the heading name as this will improve the SEO. The keywords in the heading or title of the page need to be the keywords for the topic of the page and to be about the content as this will also assist when the topic comes up in search engine results.

Descriptive headings are more beneficial on the web rather than a play on words that attract attention in print media.

Subheadings need to be intriguing and informative, too.

The information that you provide needs to stand out to the reader. Layout techniques help to attract or prevent users from reading the copy. The content should be easy to read.

Content structure complements the information and message. When you share information provide the background information which will help them understand the core message.

It should be easy to skim through and to find the information they are looking for. They will be attracted to information if the writing is simple. A long paragraph will have fewer users reading the content rather than a concise description which address and highlight the main points. Paragraphs should contain between three and four sentences. You can even include single sentence paragraphs.

Useful points to help make content easy to scan include:

  • Clear and concise headings;
  • Bulleted and numbered lists, three bullets is usually the optimal number;
  • Short paragraphs with short sentences and one thought per paragraph;
  • Do not use all capitals in any sentence as it feels aggressive and is hard to read;
  • Use Bold and italics for emphasis; and
  • Use descriptive links for example “Click here for a map”.

Your writing should take the shape of an inverted pyramid in which the main point is introduced first. The supporting sentences follow to allow the reader to scan over the points and decide what is relevant to them. Create a flow of information that will convince the viewer to read each page by:

  • Introducing the main point;
  • Incorporating key facts in the body of the text; and
  • Concluding with the least important details.

The writing style you use will not only influence users but will assist search engines to find the content that you have produced when your audience is looking for it.

If you want to cover a complex topic, consider breaking it into a series of posts. This gives the reader time to understand each piece of information separately. Line breaks make content more readable. The white space offers a friendlier environment.

Leave out what readers tend to skip. Go through the copy and look for parts that don’t communicate something meaningful. Make sure every word, every sentence is strong and pulls the reader through the copy.

Try reading your subject line, headline and introductory paragraph out loud. If the first paragraph or two sounds nice, but it’s really the third paragraph that gets to the “meat” of the copy and says anything substantive, get rid of the first two paragraphs (the “warm-up copy”) and start with the meat.

A call to action (CTA) is a short, descriptive instruction which tells a user, who is scanning the web, what to do next.

Write in the active voice, telling the user what is needed rather than using the passive voice which is less instructive. The difference between active and passive voice is that in the active voice the subject does the acting. In the passive voice the subject is acted upon.

Grammatical errors, typos, broken links and pages “under construction” are embarrassing and should be resolved and avoided prior to publishing content.

Forge a personal connection with your audiences by being natural, honest and sincere in your writing. Use similar techniques to what you would to persuade your family and friends.

“You” is the most powerful word in the English language. Readers are interested in information that will meet their needs. Focus your attention on the readers by speaking directly to them. The goal is to inform them within 10 seconds.

You are talking to a person not a vague group or demographic. Personalising your writing immediately shows that you are talking directly to your audience, as a person in front of their monitor looking at your website.

Addressing your audience as “you” will also bring about a more conversational use of language. Think about how DJ’s on the radio converse with their audiences. The modern web is really much more like radio than print.

Asking questions is an effective way to get your point across. Involving your audience in the topic will make them feel important.

It is important to understand the tone that you use to appeal to your audience. Be informative yet friendly and come across as approachable.

Avoid jargon, you may understand it, but your audience isn’t as intimate with your environment as you are.

Quotes lend authority to a story. They should not be lengthy repetitions of the update’s merits. The quote must add value. Decide who you want to quote, why you want to quote them and make sure that the quote adds to your writing.

In summary, the key ingredients to writing for the web are:

  • Understand your audience;
  • Use good unambiguous headlines;
  • Create interesting relevant content;
  • Write simply and clearly;
  • Be personable and keep the tone conversational;
  • Keep what you want to say short;
  • Get to the main point about your subject faster;
  • Update regularly;
  • Use bold words to emphasise and bullet points to list; and
  • Use keywords to tag your content.

By following these simple steps you will attract more readers and keep their attention. It will also help attract internet users who are unaware that your website has the information they are looking for, through search engine optimisation.

About Digital Bridges

Digital Bridges creates high performance organisations by unlocking the business value of the web. We create business cases, digital strategies, user requirement and functional specifications for Intranets, websites and web applications. We also develop and implement social media strategies and create powerful digital brands using eMarketing and Communication and manage brand conversations with consumers.

Digital Bridges approaches the web from a management consulting position and relies heavily on rigorous academic thinking as well as business experience. It is headed up by Kate Elphick who has a Law degree and an MBA from GIBS. Kate has spent the last fifteen years of her career on the business side of the IT industry with companies such as Datatec, Didata, Business ConneXion and Primedia.

Digital Bridges has a broad range of experience working with significant, successful clients in the Financial, Gaming, Tourism, Pharmaceutical, ICT, Legal, Airline, Professional Services, Media and Public Sectors.

To find out more about Digital Bridges, please visit www.digitalbridges.co.za or contact Kate Elphick on katee@digitalbridges.co.za

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Filed under Blogging, Business, eMarketing, Internet, Web 2.0, Web Marketing

2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by your stats.

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 3,100 times in 2010. That’s about 7 full 747s.

In 2010, there were 16 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 59 posts.

The busiest day of the year was March 9th with 37 views. The most popular post that day was Using the Balanced Scorecard to design your Digital Strategy.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were digitalbridges.co.za, en.wordpress.com, facebook.com, blogs.hbr.org, and bigextracash.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for challenges of collaboration, interactive intranet, modern intranet, intranet objectives, and ratios in the media.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Using the Balanced Scorecard to design your Digital Strategy December 2009
18 comments

2

The Role of the Intranet in the Modern Organisation February 2010
10 comments

3

Meeting the Challenges of Collaboration January 2010
4 comments

4

Employee Engagement using the Interactive Intranet November 2009
8 comments

5

Configuring the Intranet to deliver on the organisational objectives November 2009
6 comments

27 Comments

Filed under Blogging, Business, Digital Communities, eMarketing, Enterprise 2.0

Responding to powerful digital consumers

There is a right way and a wrong way to respond to consumers who are increasingly taking advantage of the power of social media to voice their unhappiness.

It all started when I got a phone call from an indescribably rude call centre operator who spoke with an accent so thick you could start a veldt fire with it. He informed me that I had been handed over to a legal firm for collections by Altech Nashua for a paid up account which I had closed in 1999. He said that there was an outstanding balance which had accumulated R6000 in interest.

He refused to eMail me any details saying that it was my responsibility to sort it out and implying that failure to do so would result in me being black listed.

I did what any good social media player would do and turned to Facebook to voice my displeasure.

Within minutes I had seventy irate comments, lots of inbox messages and a couple of people even ran instant message conversations with me. They were full of criticism, ideas and suggestions as to how to handle it. One friend even sent my complaint to the company’s PR team.

The only response which I got was a resounding silence from Altech Nashua, so at the encouragement of my friends, I turned to HelloPeter, and reposted my complaint back to Facebook.

Then I received a very polite eMail from Nashua, asking for contract details. Within minutes they had established that the contract was not theirs, explained to me that Altech is their competitor and found me the number to contact Altech.

All kudos to Nashua, they responded quickly and politely to a genuine complaint, even if it wasn’t against them and anticipated that in my anger I was not going to look up Altech’s number.

I responded by writing to Nashua to thank them, clearing up the misunderstanding on my Facebook thread and writing this blog to compliment them on the way they responded.

We have figured out that the call centre operator’s accent was so bad, that he must have been trying to say Altech Netstar and it came out sounding like Nashua.

There are a number of lessons to be learned here

  • You can’t assume that your consumers give a damn about your brand, especially when they are angry. Not one of my over 1200 friends on Facebook noticed that these were two competing brands;
  • Respond quickly and politely to complaints and try to see what the consumer’s perception is. Perception is reality and with powerful media like Facebook, your consumer can damage your reputation with a few clicks; and
  • When outsourcing to call centres – debt collection is a very inflammatory environment. Make sure that your call centre’s operators are competent, well trained and can speak intelligibly. Also make sure that they can eMail out. You can’t rely on auditory accuracy and their incompetence reflects as badly on your brand as poor front line service.

To date, Altech has not contacted me. Be careful Altech, people often research the company’s they do business with and you are not doing yourself any favours when complaints about your lack of commitment to consumers are turning up in search results. The man on the street is getting more powerful by the day and can now tell a whole lot more people when he is unhappy about something you have done.

Likewise Nashua, people can spread the good news easily using social media tools. Well done on deflecting a difficult situation and turning me into an evangelist.

About Digital Bridges

Digital Bridges creates high performance organisations by unlocking the business value of the web. We create digital strategies, user requirement and functional specifications for Intranets, websites and web applications. We also develop and implement social media strategies and create powerful digital brands using eMarketing and Communication and manage brand conversations with consumers.

Digital Bridges approaches the web from a management consulting position and relies heavily on rigorous academic thinking as well as business experience. It is headed up by Kate Elphick who has a Law degree and an MBA from GIBS. Kate has spent the last fifteen years of her career on the business side of the IT industry with companies such as Datatec, Didata, Business ConneXion and Primedia.

Digital Bridges has a broad range of experience working with significant, successful clients in the Financial, Gaming, Tourism, Pharmaceutical, ICT, Legal, Airline, Professional Services, Media and Public Sectors.

To find out more about Digital Bridges, please visit www.digitalbridges.co.za or contact Kate Elphick on katee@digitalbridges.co.za

 

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Filed under Blogging, Business, Digital Communities, Facebook

Six principles of social media management

Many of my clients want to create a page on Facebook, because they see it as a free way of exposing their products and services to potential customers. How many times have you been asked by someone you are friends with to “like” some arbitrary page? You do it out of a sense of politeness, in the hope that they are not going to pee with the exuberance of a puppy all over your news feeds.

Many pages start off enthusiastically and the dwindle into the metaphorical attic, never to see daylight again, but at least “we have a Facebook page – check social media box”.

The ability to post on social media is a right, stealing your audience’s valuable time and attention is not.

There are no hard and fast rules, but in my experimentation I have developed six guidelines to effective social media management. The list is by no means finite.

1.         Be the DJ

For those of you who listen to the radio, you do so to be entertained and informed. Consider who you or your company are and entertain your audience in the same way as radio DJ’s do. What would they find interesting? Why should they see what you put out there? Are they really interested in being spammed with product price lists?

If you keep them entertained, they will look forward to seeing your posts in the clutter that is social media. You will be top of mind when they are in the market for your offerings.

2.         Take a strategic approach

Just because it is on Facebook doesn’t mean that your brand is frivolous. It actually means that you are even closer to your (potential) clients. Decide why you want to use social media; is it to position your brand in a certain way, or to enhance your relationships with your clients?

You cannot allocate a junior resource to manage your social media brand. This is particularly true if you have a knowledge brand like universities, ICT’s, media, pharmaceuticals, finance houses, management consultancies etc. You need someone with the experience and strategic insight to represent your brand in real time on line.

3.         Not everyone is going to like you

It is impossible to be all things to all people, but you can improve your relevance to the groups of people who follow you. Experiment with your posts and see who “likes”, “retweets” what.

Your audience consists of real people. Divide them up by demographics or into other groups that make sense and try different things. Some people respond to comedy, others to interesting articles. Look at what other people are doing and who responds to them. This will let you improve the value you provide your audience.

Of course you can’t see the lurkers who just watch what you are going, but then that is the nature of the beast. There will also always be people who don’t appreciate your efforts. If they are not your target audience, it is OK if they go. If, however you find yourself losing friends and followers who you would like to keep, you need to question the quality of your work.

4.         Reciprocate

Comment on what other people are doing, retweet and like what they are saying. People like responses and validation. The magic of social media lies in your ability to have conversations.

5.         Be real

Organisations are not people. The choice of your digital presence depends on who you are. Are you your brand or is it a separate entity, an amalgamation of the people behind the brand?

The people within the organisation should be visible behind the brand if you decide to create a company page.

Organisations can make announcements about events and competitions, but real people should ask questions, joke or comment.

6.         Be present

Decide what the optimum number of posts should be and be prepared to put the time in. Make time to engage with your audience regularly.

Social media is an incredibly powerful marketing tool, but it is not necessarily an easy one. It takes time, effort and strategic insight to reap the rewards. It doesn’t replace your real world marketing, but should seamlessly complement your physical engagement with your customers.

About Digital Bridges

Digital Bridges creates high performance organisations by unlocking the business value of the web. We create digital strategies, user requirement and functional specifications for Intranets, websites and web applications. We also develop and implement social media strategies and create powerful digital brands using eMarketing and Communication and manage brand conversations with consumers.

Digital Bridges approaches the web from a management consulting position and relies heavily on rigorous academic thinking as well as business experience. It is headed up by Kate Elphick who has a Law degree and an MBA from GIBS. Kate has spent the last fifteen years of her career on the business side of the IT industry with companies such as Datatec, Didata, Business ConneXion and Primedia.

Digital Bridges has a broad range of experience working with significant, successful clients in the Financial, Gaming, Tourism, Pharmaceutical, ICT, Legal, Airline, Professional Services, Media and Public Sectors.

To find out more about Digital Bridges, please visit www.digitalbridges.co.za or contact Kate Elphick on katee@digitalbridges.co.za

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Filed under Blogging, Business, Digital Communities, eMarketing, Enterprise 2.0, Facebook, Web 2.0, Web Marketing

Hard-coding the organisation’s strategy into your Intranet

In the past, Intranets have been, at best, archives of potentially useful information like leave forms and what is on the lunch menu at the cafeteria, covered in a strategic veneer of the organisational vision, mission and values on the landing page. In many organisations, Intranets are mausoleums of unfindable and outdated documents.

With the advent of the interactive web (web 2.0) we have the ability to hard code the organisational strategy into an organic ecosystem which forms the backbone of the enterprise, surfacing knowledge and behaviour in ways impossible before. The secret lies in data modelling.

Because web 2.0 enables employees to engage with the Intranet, they are generating metadata about how they are using the information and connecting with each other. There are a number of data sets that we can combine in the same way that DNA is structured to make the intranet dynamic and far more useful.

These datasets include information from people’s profiles, who they are, what interests them, what they are working on, their key performance areas etc. Other datasets come from the metadata in documents, what they are about, who is creating, reading, updating and commenting on them, the taxonomy how the information is categorised and stored.

When infusing these datasets with meaning, we use data architectures to inculcate the organisational strategies. These architectures are generated by translating the organisational strategy into a matrix configured according to KPI’s and organisational design.

So how do we do this?

We start with the organisational strategy, what is the vision is for where the organisation is going and how it will get there? What products and services it sells, which geographies, where its competitive advantages are, what are its strengths weaknesses opportunities and threats?

Then we examine how the organisation has been configured to do this, what is the organisational design, what are the employees key performance areas, what processes are in place and which technologies are being used?

At a deeper level of granularity, we translate the employee data into profiles from which we get the information about how they deliver on the strategy. Typical data includes variables about where they fit into the organisational structure, what information they need, what tasks they need to perform, the knowledge and skills and experience they have.

The categories of information that employees need to do their work is translated into a taxonomy and site structure which is intuitive and web 2.0 tools, such as wikis and blogs are added to enable them to engage with each other and create read and update information and knowledge.

Making it easy to find what they need is ensured by using semantic and predictive search. This is important because unless employees find the Intranet useful and easy to use, they will not use it.

Next we map the organisational processes for delivery on the strategy and relate them back to the employees using data. We also examine the other tools that we have to hand for data input, such as the technologies which could be integrated including ERP systems etc. Workflow is built into the processes on the Intranet.

Metadata is created for documents, online conversations and behaviours. This can be automated in applications like MS SharePoint 2010, and will feed into the search.

We can also identify additional external datasets which could enhance the employees ability to deliver, such as RSS feeds from the Dow Jones or the latest updates from industry research bodies.

A word of caution

Projects like these should not be undertaken lightly, the development of Intranet strategies can take a couple of months and requires executive commitment.

If the organisation is dysfunctional, or the processes are not optimised, you can wind up coding inefficiencies into the DNA of the organisation.

It is important to ensure that whoever facilitates the development of the strategy is a business minded person who understands how organisations function and be optimised.

Technologist often understand the software and could fit the organisation into the software, where because web 2.0 is all about people, the business must define the technology requirements.

Benefits of this approach

The benefits of this approach are numerous:

  • A data driven approach enables agility within large organisations because as they change, it is possible to code new directions, processes and innovations into the strategic backbone of the enterprise;
  • Communication, information and knowledge can be pushed to employees in a bespoke manner based on their specific requirements.
  • It is possible to create an individually customised view of the Intranet to ensure that employees only see what they need to see which increases the relevance to each employee, and reduces information overload;
  • Knowledge can be created once and used multiple times;
  • Organisational networks can be surfaced for succession planning, and to understand who is networking with whom; and
  • Performance can be managed through an understanding of what individuals are doing.

By using a data driven approach we can now code the strategy and the way we do things into an organic, expanding Intranet and truly drive competitive advantage.

About Digital Bridges

Digital Bridges creates high performance organisations by unlocking the business value of the web. We create digital strategies, user requirement and functional specifications for Intranets, websites and web applications. We also develop and implement social media strategies and create powerful digital brands using eMarketing and Communication and manage brand conversations with consumers.

Digital Bridges approaches the web from a management consulting position and relies heavily on rigorous academic thinking as well as business experience. It is headed up by Kate Elphick who has a Law degree and an MBA from GIBS. Kate has spent the last fifteen years of her career on the business side of the IT industry with companies such as Datatec, Didata, Business ConneXion and Primedia.

Digital Bridges has a broad range of experience working with significant, successful clients in the Financial, Gaming, Tourism, Pharmaceutical, ICT, Legal, Airline, Professional Services, Media and Public Sectors.

To find out more about Digital Bridges, please visit www.digitalbridges.co.za or contact Kate Elphick on katee@digitalbridges.co.za

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Filed under Blogging, Business, Digital Communities, Enterprise 2.0, HR Intranet, Interactive Intranets, Semantics

The changing role of public relations

There is no doubt that web 2.0 is changing the traditional role of the public relations practitioner.

In the past, PR was all about creating press releases and finding novel ways to get information into the public domain through the media or events etc. In fact for many, PR stood for Press Releases rather than Public Relations, and PR companies could get away with very junior writers who churned out press releases in the background to be spammed to journalists in the hope that they would appear in print somewhere.

These days our relationships with the world are much more directed. Companies need to manage their relationships directly with their audiences, not through disseminated one way messages in third party channels, but through conversations; bilateral, and in some instances multilateral flows of information and knowledge directly with the audience.

Digital curation in the past has been about the selection, preservation, maintenance and collection and archiving of digital assets. It is the process of establishing and developing long term repositories of digital assets for current and future reference.

Assets are what an organisation uses in order to generate revenue, they may be people, material, buildings or brands.

Today one of the most important assets an organisation can have is its relationships. In an attention deficit world, the most effective way to get people’s notice is through trusted relationships. Relationships become trust filters for sifting through what is valuable to know and what should be ignored. So the concept of digital curation is extending beyond the management of the website and social media pages into digital relationship asset creation and management.

It is no longer the job of just one person in the organisation, but in high performance organisations it is the job of everyone in the organisation.

About Digital Bridges

Digital Bridges creates high performance organisations by unlocking the business value of the web. We create digital strategies, user requirement and functional specifications for Intranets, websites and web applications. We also develop and implement social media strategies and create powerful digital brands using eMarketing and Communication and manage brand conversations with consumers.

Digital Bridges approaches the web from a management consulting position and relies heavily on rigorous academic thinking as well as business experience. It is headed up by Kate Elphick who has a Law degree and an MBA from GIBS. Kate has spent the last fifteen years of her career on the business side of the IT industry with companies such as Datatec, Didata, Business ConneXion and Primedia.

Digital Bridges has a broad range of experience working with significant, successful clients in the Financial, Gaming, Tourism, Pharmaceutical, ICT, Legal, Airline, Professional Services, Media and Public Sectors.

To find out more about Digital Bridges, please visit www.digitalbridges.co.za or contact Kate Elphick on katee@digitalbridges.co.za

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Filed under Blogging, Business, Digital Communities, eMarketing, Enterprise 2.0, Semantics, Web 2.0, Web Marketing

The Porous Web

I often see clients who ask me to assist them in developing a web site, potentially in SharePoint 2010 or using some other open source technology. While it is important to have some kind of digital real estate, it is more important to look at how people use the web these days.

From our audience point of view the Internet is one great big environment from which they can consume information, engage with each other and entertain themselves.

Our domain is only one place they can go to to do this, but there are multiple other places. We need to consider the entire environment. The website is only one element of our conversation on line. These days our audiences practise osmosis as they flow from places of low value to high value.

High value is a product of information and context. Information is available everywhere, but if it can’t be found or it does not come from a trustworthy source its value is compromised. So how do we make sure that we deliver high value in this porous environment? We do this by designing our projects around audiences through content architectures, digital geographies, SEO and curatorship.

Content Architectures

Content architectures are thought constructs which examine how we wish to position ourselves in our audience minds, and what we need to say or do in order to achieve this. They require a thorough investigation into our audience’s motivations, worlds-views and environments.

Digital Geography

Digital geography is concerned with where our audiences are, are they on social media sites, looking through lists, browsing or on special interest sites. Do we need to make sure that we have a presence on Facebook, Twitter or that on-line newspaper? What industry forums are they consulting, who are the thought leaders?

SEO

These days, very few people type in the name of our domain to find us, they are far more likely to go to their preferred search engine, whether it be Yahoo, Bing or the ubiquitous Google and type in a search term. If we can’t be found easily, we have wasted our efforts. We need to make sure that whatever we put out there can is as search engine friendly as possible.

Curatorship

Curatorship is the human intervention which adds value. These are trusted sources of information who assemble information and contextualise it. They may be thought leaders, bloggers, on line journalists or even someone inside our own company who engages with our audience or who they follow or engage with to filter the masses of information out there and make it easy to consume.

Far too many companies develop website strategies, but to create competitive advantage in the digital world, we should rather create digital strategies which encompass the entire digital milieu.

About Digital Bridges

Digital Bridges creates high performance organisations by unlocking the business value of the web. We create digital strategies, user requirement and functional specifications for Intranets, websites and web applications. We also develop and implement social media strategies and create powerful digital brands using eMarketing and Communication and manage brand conversations with consumers.

Digital Bridges approaches the web from a management consulting position and relies heavily on rigorous academic thinking as well as business experience. It is headed up by Kate Elphick who has a Law degree and an MBA from GIBS. Kate has spent the last fifteen years of her career on the business side of the IT industry with companies such as Datatec, Didata, Business ConneXion and Primedia.

Digital Bridges has a broad range of experience working with significant, successful clients in the Financial, Gaming, Tourism, Pharmaceutical, ICT, Legal, Airline, Professional Services, Media and Public Sectors.

To find out more about Digital Bridges, please visit www.digitalbridges.co.za or contact Kate Elphick on katee@digitalbridges.co.za

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Filed under Blogging, Business, Digital Communities, eMarketing, Enterprise 2.0, Facebook, Google, Web 2.0, Web Marketing